You don’t want the opinion of another writer.

(Source: autoashirwin)

19,949 notes

penamerican:

PEN at the UN Human Rights Council: End Impunity for the Killing of Mexican Journalists
PEN American Center will be in Geneva next week to press our concerns about free expression in Mexico, China, and Nigeria. All three countries come under scrutiny this month as part of the United Nations Human Rights Council’s Universal Periodic Review process, which examines the human rights record of each UN member country every four years. Now in its sixth year, the UPR has become an vital mechanism for documenting and discouraging human rights violations around the world, and an important forum for PEN to focus international attention on countries where writers and journalists are especially at risk. Very high on that list is Mexico, where forty-six journalists have been killed since 2006. PEN American Center has been protesting the violence against journalists in Mexico for more than a decade, and in 2012 we joined an international delegation to call for the federalization of crimes against journalists—crimes which previously went unsolved because they fell under state jurisdiction. The Senate voted to federalize the crimes, but the Mexican government has been slow to assert its new authority to investigate and prosecute attacks, as Freedom to Write director Larry Siems noted after a follow-up visit to Mexico earlier this year.

penamerican:

PEN at the UN Human Rights Council: End Impunity for the Killing of Mexican Journalists

PEN American Center will be in Geneva next week to press our concerns about free expression in Mexico, China, and Nigeria. All three countries come under scrutiny this month as part of the United Nations Human Rights Council’s Universal Periodic Review process, which examines the human rights record of each UN member country every four years. Now in its sixth year, the UPR has become an vital mechanism for documenting and discouraging human rights violations around the world, and an important forum for PEN to focus international attention on countries where writers and journalists are especially at risk. Very high on that list is Mexico, where forty-six journalists have been killed since 2006. PEN American Center has been protesting the violence against journalists in Mexico for more than a decade, and in 2012 we joined an international delegation to call for the federalization of crimes against journalists—crimes which previously went unsolved because they fell under state jurisdiction. The Senate voted to federalize the crimes, but the Mexican government has been slow to assert its new authority to investigate and prosecute attacks, as Freedom to Write director Larry Siems noted after a follow-up visit to Mexico earlier this year.

10 notes

visual-poetry:

»the power of words« by anthony smith

inspired by ‘the power of words’ by edgar allan poe. the design takes the dialogue of the protagonists and breaks it into two, creating a conversation between two books, bound together.

2,119 notes

shesonlylittle:

One of my best boys is graduating this Sunday and so I made him a handy thing to use whenever people ask “And what do you plan on doing with that?” Which is still every other day of my life, even a year after getting my diploma.

shesonlylittle:

One of my best boys is graduating this Sunday and so I made him a handy thing to use whenever people ask “And what do you plan on doing with that?” Which is still every other day of my life, even a year after getting my diploma.

2,164 notes

sinidentidades:

Kenya chief justice acts against ‘grass cutting’ rapists
Kenya’s chief justice said Saturday he had ordered “immediate action” over a case where men accused of brutally gang raping a schoolgirl were ordered to cut grass as punishment.
The ferocious attack on the teenage girl and the lack of action against those who carried it out sparked outrage in the country, while over 1.3 million people worldwide have signed a petition demanding justice.
The 16-year-old, known by the pseudonym Liz, was reportedly attacked, beaten and then raped by six men as she returned from her grandfather’s funeral in western Kenya in June, before the gang dumped her, bleeding and unconscious, in a deep sewage ditch.
"I have sent the matter to the National Council for the Administration of Justice (NCAJ) for immediate action," Kenya Chief Justice Willy Mutunga said Saturday.
The NCAJ is Kenya’s top-level judicial oversight body bringing together the judiciary, police, attorney-general and director of public prosecutions.
On Thursday, hundreds of protestors marched through Nairobi wearing T-shirts with the slogan “Justice for Liz” and draping dozens of women’s knickers along the fence of the police station.
Nebila Abdulmelik, of the women’s rights campaign group Femnet launched the petition demanding justice.
"Our immediate task is for the arrest and prosecution of the perpetrators, and then disciplinary action at the police who failed to take action, because we feel that they embolden others to rape," Abdulmelik said during the demonstration.
"We are using Liz’s story to bring to light all the other cases of violence that are not necessarily reported to the media, to the police."
Liz is now wheelchair-bound with a broken back, caused either by the beating or by being hurled down into the pit, and also suffered serious internal injuries from the rape.
Her mother told the Daily Nation newspaper, which first reported the story, that three men identified by Liz were only ordered to cut grass around the police station.

sinidentidades:

Kenya chief justice acts against ‘grass cutting’ rapists

Kenya’s chief justice said Saturday he had ordered “immediate action” over a case where men accused of brutally gang raping a schoolgirl were ordered to cut grass as punishment.

The ferocious attack on the teenage girl and the lack of action against those who carried it out sparked outrage in the country, while over 1.3 million people worldwide have signed a petition demanding justice.

The 16-year-old, known by the pseudonym Liz, was reportedly attacked, beaten and then raped by six men as she returned from her grandfather’s funeral in western Kenya in June, before the gang dumped her, bleeding and unconscious, in a deep sewage ditch.

"I have sent the matter to the National Council for the Administration of Justice (NCAJ) for immediate action," Kenya Chief Justice Willy Mutunga said Saturday.

The NCAJ is Kenya’s top-level judicial oversight body bringing together the judiciary, police, attorney-general and director of public prosecutions.

On Thursday, hundreds of protestors marched through Nairobi wearing T-shirts with the slogan “Justice for Liz” and draping dozens of women’s knickers along the fence of the police station.

Nebila Abdulmelik, of the women’s rights campaign group Femnet launched the petition demanding justice.

"Our immediate task is for the arrest and prosecution of the perpetrators, and then disciplinary action at the police who failed to take action, because we feel that they embolden others to rape," Abdulmelik said during the demonstration.

"We are using Liz’s story to bring to light all the other cases of violence that are not necessarily reported to the media, to the police."

Liz is now wheelchair-bound with a broken back, caused either by the beating or by being hurled down into the pit, and also suffered serious internal injuries from the rape.

Her mother told the Daily Nation newspaper, which first reported the story, that three men identified by Liz were only ordered to cut grass around the police station.

28 notes

sinidentidades:

67 civilians were killed by US drone strikes since 2008 according to figures released by Pakistan's military.

The figure amounts to just 3% of the total number killed and is strikingly lower than tallies compiled by organisations that track drone attacks through media reports, which claim many hundreds of civilians have been killed.

The information, released by Pakistan’s Ministry of Defence to a parliamentary inquiry, also said no civilians were killed in 2012 and 2013. The military said 2,160 Islamic militants were killed since 2008.

The claim is likely to cause widespread surprise in a country where the remote controlled aircraft are widely hated, in large part because of the popular belief that they kill many civilians.

It also puzzled analysts, many of whom have long assumed Pakistan has deliberately stoked anti-drone sentiment by publicising claims of killings of civilians.

"It is a very interesting turn in this whole debate," said Ayesha Siddiqa, an academic who specialises in scrutinising Pakistan’s powerful military establishment. "It’s going to play havoc with all those [anti-drone campaigners] who have been arguing that drones kill a lot of people and therefore must be stopped.”

Basic information about the number of civilians and militants killed by drones is controversial and highly politicised in Pakistan.

The US refuses to provide information about individual strikes, which it says are secret, although officials do claim drones kill very few civilians.

Independent investigators are unable to operate in the dangerous tribal borderlands of Waziristan where nearly all drone strikes take place, while locals are often prevented from observing drone damage by militants.

There is also a risk of eye witnesses and relatives of the dead coming under pressure from militants to provide false or inaccurate information, a recent report on drones by Amnesty International warned.

Despite the difficulties, some groups have attempted to assess drone strikes by collating information published by media reports, although such reports were criticised for being potentially highly misleading in a report by the Columbia Law School last year.

According to the London based Bureau of Investigative Journalism, at least 300 civilians have been killed by drones since 2008.

Distinguishing civilians from those engaged in hostilities is also difficult and the latest figures from Pakistan may reflect a broad definition of “militant”.

After each strike Pakistan has lodged forthright public complaints with the US, despite substantial evidence that it has secretly co-operated with the CIA-led programme.

One high-profile anti-drone campaigner, a lawyer called Shahzad Akbar, claimed the military was bowing to US pressure with the surprisingly low figures.

"Maybe it is in return for the $1.6bn the US has agreed to give," he said. "It is an absolutely absurdity, we all know it is not really true figures." He pointed instead to higher figures given by government officials to a hearing at the Peshawar high court.

Relations between Pakistan and the US have been improving in recent months. The US president, Barack Obama, held a White House meeting with Pakistani prime minister, Nawaz Sharif, last week. Despite Sharif’s claim that he would raise the drone issue, there was no mention of it in the two leaders’ joint statement.

Senior officials have hinted that an understanding has been reached with the US which will see drone strikes come to an end in the near future.

However, late on Wednesday it was reported that a drone struck a militant compound near Miranshah, the capital of North Waziristan, killing three.

16 notes

andisbetter:

Like. 
Thanks Internet for combining so many wonderful things to distract us from work. At Ford we also like putting great things together, like entertainment AND technology to make that drive to work even better.

andisbetter:

Like.

Thanks Internet for combining so many wonderful things to distract us from work. At Ford we also like putting great things together, like entertainment AND technology to make that drive to work even better.

12,495 notes

lotuspower:

And so I did. I keep waiting for that feeling of panic. Instead I’m bathing in joy. 

lotuspower:

And so I did. I keep waiting for that feeling of panic. Instead I’m bathing in joy. 

15 notes

joyfulpantsofbuttlol:

archiemcphee:

These awesome photos, in which rolling waves appear to be both perfectly frozen in time and miraculously made solid, are the work of French photographer Pierre Carreau.

Carreau “shoots waves with a variety of high speed cameras using various macro and wide angle lenses, capturing water shapes that appear more sculptural than liquid.”

Visit his Pierre Carreau’s website to view many more examples of his amazing work. He also offers prints of some of his images via Clic Gallery.

[via Colossal]

BUT HOOOOOOOOWWWWWWWW!

42,685 notes

inothernews:

collegehumor:

The Ultimate LeBron James Flopping Reel [Click for more]

Yeah but Jordan had a better call-in-sick-to-work voice.

Take that, soccer!!!

1,992 notes

goodreasonnews:

I think “seriously” is the key word here.

(Source: mediaite)

341,425 notes